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JENNIFER RUBIN: Run, Joe, run?

I have written in favor of Vice President Joe Biden’s plausibility as a presidential candidate (and am pleased I am not alone). But how would he do it, and would he face a backlash from female Democrats?

ED ROGERS: Could Biden be the anti-Hillary candidate?

There seems to be a lot more talk in Washington and in political operative circles around the country about the prospect of Vice President Joe Biden running for president in 2016. Interesting. Is a Biden candidacy more likely as a result of his recent family tragedy? It would be perfectly plausible for anyone who has suffered the kind of loss he has to want to rededicate themselves to their life’s work as well as stay as busy as possible. There is probably no better way on earth to stay busy than to run for president, to say nothing of how busy your life becomes if you ultimately get elected. The death of Biden’s son and the way he handled it with such dignity and grace struck a chord with not just Americans but also with people all over the world. Perhaps it made people see him in a new light and maybe even revealed a somewhat hidden dimension of his character.

JENNIFER RUBIN: Dear Chris Christie: Candor is not the same as a moral compass

In anticipation of his expected presidential kick-off announcement, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie on Sunday put out a video ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=37&v=4gFOz—UlHbM) trying to explain his personality in positive terms, as an over-abundance of candor. He tells a story about his mother who told him never to hold back, to always say what was on his mind. He ends by saying, “And when you ask about my moral compass that’s it. That’s it.”

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RedBlueAmerica: Should Alexander Hamilton make way for a woman on the $10 bill?

The Treasury Department recently announced that Alexander Hamilton, America’s first secretary of the treasury, will have to share the $10 bill with an as-yet-unnamed woman — Rosa Parks? Harriet Tubman? — starting in 2020. Supporters are glad to see somebody besides a white guy on America’s money; critics have complained about political correctness the possible diminishing of Hamilton’s stature in the nation’s historical memory.

Confederacy’s ugly history cannot be painted over

The lowering of Confederate battle flags across the South is not a victory. It’s a correction, a small one, and to treat it like a victory is wrong and divisive given the example in Charleston, South Carolina, where the forgiving grace of nine families in funeral corteges is a continuing miracle that makes the head bow with humility.

Confederacy’s ugly history cannot be painted over

The lowering of Confederate battle flags across the South is not a victory. It’s a correction, a small one, and to treat it like a victory is wrong and divisive given the example in Charleston, South Carolina, where the forgiving grace of nine families in funeral corteges is a continuing miracle that makes the head bow with humility.

Should Alexander Hamilton make way for a woman on the $10 bill?

The Treasury Department recently announced that Alexander Hamilton, America’s first secretary of the treasury, will have to share the $10 bill with an as-yet-unnamed woman — Rosa Parks? Harriet Tubman? — starting in 2020. Supporters are glad to see somebody besides a white guy on America’s money; critics have complained about political correctness the possible diminishing of Hamilton’s stature in the nation’s historical memory.

BRAD HIRSCHFIELD: I don’t perform gay marriages, but I celebrate the Supreme Court decision

The Supreme Court made history on Friday, that much is clear. What may be less clear, especially for those who do not support same-sex marriage, is that the 5-to-4 majority opinion written by Justice Anthony Kennedy, merits celebration even by those who don’t agree with the conclusion reached. And to be totally transparent, I write those words as an Orthodox rabbi who does not officiate at same-sex marriages.